Tag Archives: Eric Broug

Sahand Hesamiyan – Sculptor of Islamic Art

Any readers who have visited my previous blog may recognise the name Sahand Hesamiyan as an artist whose sculptures I have previously blogged about. Hesamiyan’s latest sculpture, Sulook, is currently being exhibited at The Third Line gallery in Dubai, UAE, and so I feel the need to revisit his work and express why I like it so much.

Sulook by Sahand Hesamiyan, 2012
Sulook (maquette) by Sahand Hesamiyan, 2012
Steel, UV Color, and Black Light
417x190x190 cm

Sahand Hesamiyan is an Iranian Sculptor who uses geometric shapes to build sculptures creating a 3D representation of the patterns and spaces they can produce. Sculpture is a favourite area of art for me when combined with this practice as I’ve always been fascinated with how patterns are created and transformed especially by our own motion within a given exhibition space. These types of sculptures create illusions too. In the case of Sulook you can grasp the impression of an eternity being displayed through the required use of mathematics producing continued rows of shapes that fit perfectly together. Within this post you’ll see exclusive photos provided by Hesamiyan (thanks so much!) conveying many aspects of the intricately built work…

Sulook by Sahand Hesamiyan at The Third Line gallery, Dubai, UAE
Sulook by Sahand Hesamiyan, 2012
Steel, UV Color, and Black Light
417x190x190 cm

 

by Sahand Hesamiyan, 2012 Steel, UV Color, and Black Light 417x190x190 cm
Sulook by Sahand Hesamiyan, 2012
Steel, UV Color, and Black Light
417x190x190 cm

 

by Sahand Hesamiyan, 2012 Steel, UV Color, and Black Light 417x190x190 cm
Close-up of Sulook by Sahand Hesamiyan, 2012
Steel, UV Color, and Black Light
417x190x190 cm

 

by Sahand Hesamiyan, 2012 Steel, UV Color, and Black Light 417x190x190 cm
Close-up of Sulook by Sahand Hesamiyan, 2012
Steel, UV Color, and Black Light
417x190x190 cm

The construction of this piece and how it appears when looking into the centre reminds me very much of the Muqarnas feature used uniquely in Islamic Architecture. It is formed by what appears to be many small domes carved out of plaster or stone. Muqarnas has been used beautifully for the interiors of many a Mosque dome and also at the head of plinths and connecting arches. There are some examples of Muqarnas and an explanation of how they are constructed on Eric Broug’s ‘Broug Atelier‘ site.

Here is a classic example of the Muqarnas featured within an arched alcove in the famous Royal (Imam) Mosque in Isfahan, Iran:

Image of Muqarnas at The Rpyal (Imam) Mosque in Isfahan, Iran
Image of Muqarnas at The Royal (Imam) Mosque in Isfahan, Iran (image taken from: http://www.ne.jp/asahi/arc/ind/1_primer/questions/xdec_eng.htm, 30-01-13)

If you’d like to read more on Sahand Hesamiyan’s art work then please visit his site: http://www.sahandhesamiyan.com/exhibitions-solo/sulook/